Siobhan Fedden

Siobhan Fedden is an Artist Curator based in Plymouth, UK. My artistic and curatorial practice explores systems within the art world, specifically focusing on the role of institutions and their relationship with developing technology in terms of how art is experienced. Documentation and preservation of artwork are key areas of this that my practice focuses on.

The above images show the way I have been utilising social media to promote Dis. Is Serious. I posted up a link to the exhibition event page with an image of the flyer to Twitter and directly tagged galleries within Plymouth to the post. As can be seen, members of staff from Plymouth Art Centre, Plymouth City Museum and Art Gallery and Karst, all key art venues within Plymouth, have shared my post. On Facebook, two events that I work for have kindly shared the event to support me. Above, I have also included a screenshot of an email I produced and sent to a few people within Plymouths art scene that I felt would be really valuable to have attend the exhibition. I have also shared the event page as much as possible via Facebook, onto friends Facebook pages, groups I am part of and other event pages. 

When creating exhibition space within 10, Hyde Park Road, it was important for me and Harry Watson to go through the proper channels. This required contacting the accommodation company who rent out the property and landlord who owns the property to ask permission to host public events within the house. 

I sent the following email to ask permission:

Dear ————-, 

With your permission, I am looking to host small non-profit art events within 10, Hyde Park Road. I have confirmed with all other housemates that they have no issues with me doing this. I intend for these to be public events that have a duration of four hours at most, so I intend to obtain public liability insurance. All those attending will be banned from bringing alcohol as this is not a party, it is an opportunity to look at artwork. The events will be exhibitions of artworks and art performances, none of which can cause damage to the property in any way. I have taken this step in contacting you to really just ask your permission, please respond as soon as you are able. 

Yours sincerely, 

Siobhan Fedden

In response to this it was confirmed that I could host art events within the property, so long as I obtained the signatures of all other tenants and public liability insurance.

Dis. Is Serious: Exhibition Concept: On the use of ‘post-internet’

The term ‘post-internet’ is a very recent term, which functions in many ways within art writing and criticism. By this I am referring to the varying definitions it has, ranging from Marisa Olson’s definition of post-internet as “Art made after one’s use of the internet. ‘The yeild’ of her surfing and computer use, as she describes it.” (McHugh, 2011) to “when the photo of the art object is more widely dispersed than the object itself” (McHugh, 2011) as defined by Guthrie Lonergan. As it is so current, one particular definition has not yet been fully taken on by consensus as the official definition. Because of this, it is often viewed as a contentious term when used in art writing because it does not have the same integration into art history that the term ‘post-modernism’ for example, has. 

When developing the concept for the exhibition ‘Dis. Is Serious’, Bobby Higginson brought up this issue and suggested instead that we use the term ‘proto-internet’, referencing a particular text from culturetwo. “Post- presupposes finitude, closure, knowing retrospection. Proto- points to multiplicity and possibility.” (culturetwo 2014). The text brings up issues with the term ‘post’ implying after internet and makes a very considered argument. However, for the purpose of the exhibition concept it makes sense to use the term ‘post-internet’ rather than ‘proto-internet’ as it already has a level of circulation and use within art writing, however minimal and contentious it has more stability than ‘proto-internet’. 

Within the exhibition concept I am using the term ‘post-internet’ as defined by Gene McHugh as “art responding to [a condition] described as ‘Post Internet’–when the Internet is less a novelty and more a banality” (Mchugh, 2011) because the artists exhibited are producing artwork from a unique perspective as digital natives, to discuss the way content, specifically that of a sexual nature, is experienced within an environment in which the internet and our virtual lives have merged with our physical lives, radically changing our worldview. As digital natives the way we produce and understand artwork is different from past generations because of the way the internet is part of our everyday lives. 

- Siobhan Fedden

Dis. Is Serious: Exhibition Concept

Exhibiting the work of five artists, Dis. Is Serious is an art event that explores conceptual ideas of what privacy means, how explicit content is viewed and disseminated. Ranging from sculpture to moving image, the works enquire into sex and how we relate to one another in post-internet culture, with the integration of the internet into our everyday lives. 

It’s nothing new within art history to view exhibitions within houses. Playing on these historical roots within curatorial practice, Dis. Collective has chosen to host art events within student housing as a means to conceptually explore what it means to be a student artist and the position of students within the art world. Finding a niche within Plymouth’s art scene, Dis. Collective looks to exhibit the work of students, and bring those interested in art together to network and experience new artwork through regular art events. 

- Siobhan Fedden

Dis. Collectives blog:

http://discollective.tumblr.com/

I have created a blog for Dis. Collective, to provide an online platform to exhibit artwork online from artists that we physically exhibit and for use as a promotional tool. It will also be used as a space to display documentation, exhibition concepts and artist concepts from art events and exhibitions. 

Dis. Collective

What is Dis. Collective?

An art collective that provides a platform for students and alumni to exhibit artwork as a means to create dialogue about the position of students within the art world and the notion of the ‘professional artist’. This is achieved through a program of evening events displaying a wide range of artwork. 

It’s nothing new within art history to view exhibitions within houses. Playing on these historical roots within curatorial practice, Dis. Collective has chosen to host art events within student housing as a means to conceptually explore what it means to be a student artist and the position of students within the art world. Finding a niche within Plymouth’s art scene, Dis. Collective looks to exhibit the work of students, and bring those interested in art together to network and experience new artwork through regular art events. 

Alongside documentation of exhibitions, Dis. Collective’s blog exhibits the work of those who reside within 10 Hyde Park Road, Dis. Collective’s current exhibition space. Dis. Collective is currently exhibiting artwork within a student house as a means to conceptually explore what it means to be a student artist and the position of students within the art world. There are currently five students who are permanent residents within the house, so exhibiting their artwork within Dis. Collective’s remit, conceptually explores the idea of what it means to be a ‘resident artist’. 

Current Location: Plymouth, England

I wrote the above text to give information on Dis.Collective for the Dis.Collective exhibition blog. 

discollective:

Dis. Is Serious

Exhibiting the work of five artists, Dis. Is Serious is an art event that explores conceptual ideas of what privacy means, how explicit content is viewed and disseminated. Ranging from sculpture to moving image, the works enquire into sex and how we relate to one another in post-internet culture, with the integration of the internet into our everyday lives. 

It’s nothing new within art history to view exhibitions within houses. Playing on these historical roots within curatorial practice, Dis. Collective has chosen to host art events within student housing as a means to conceptually explore what it means to be a student artist and the position of students within the art world. Finding a niche within Plymouth’s art scene, Dis. Collective looks to exhibit the work of students, and bring those interested in art together to network and experience new artwork through regular art events. 

Join the event on Facebook here,

This is the exhibition flyer produced by Harry Watson. I wrote the exhibition concept that can be viewed below. 

trawl the web and reformat what they find and make into a politics of how we produce (or name) art objects rather than of what we produce.

Andrew Durbin for Mousse Magazine 

Gallery Residency

Working with moving image requires specific conditions for display. This meant that when given the opportunity to be a resident artist within a gallery space, I found it difficult to display my work alongside the other resident artists within the space as the gallery space was to light to project film onto the walls. To deal with this I initially exhibited my work in the darker entrance space, but felt that I was isolated from the other artists and not benefiting from the opportunity to work in a space with other artists, exchange ideas and view each others process of creating work.

Playing on the way in which temporary spaces are built within gallery spaces for the projection of moving image, I chose to produce a temporary structure. Utilising the materials already available to me within the space, ie. floor mats, a tripod and benches, I build the structure that can be seen in the image above. The final projection within the structure created was not of the highest quality but I felt that it was not about this final result but about the production of this space and what it means to build these exhibition spaces inside gallery spaces. In reflection of these ideas, I filmed myself building the structure, to focus on the process and to produce new moving image work.  

Day 4: Gallery Residency

15:28 - This morning I researched into artists that are relevant to the work I have done as part of this residency and filmed myself taking down the structure I created the day before. In the afternoon I attended a talk within the gallery space by Jack Parrott, on studying a curatorial MA. Afterwards we discussed curating and studying a curatorial MA in more depth.  We also discussed the possibility of me working for him in the future in producing a particular film based artwork he is interested in creating.

Day 3: Gallery Residency

Projection onto wall in darker entrance space

Day 3: Gallery Residency

Projection onto ceiling 

Day 3: Gallery Residency

14:37 - This morning I worked on some writing for my 302 module and edited my blog. In the afternoon I experimented with different ways of projecting my films within the darker space that leads into the main gallery space.

Images of projection onto the ceiling can be viewed by clicking here.

Wall projections can be viewed here.

16:14 - In response to my lack of ability to project within the main space of the gallery, I decided to attempt to build a temporary projection space, utilizing the materials that are already within the space. I built it out of foam mats, benches and a tripod, as these are a few of the materials within the space. I also filmed this process as a method of documentation but also to produce moving image work from this process. I also completed my 302 module.

PAC Home Curatorial Grant Application

I have also included below a text based copy of my application so that it can be easily read via my blog:

PAC Home Curatorial Grant Application

Curator/Exhibition Director: Siobhan Fedden

Artists: Amanda Leman, Paul Hillon, Carl Arnold-Young, Harry William Watson

Exhibition Concept:

An enquiry into differing ways painting can be utilized to explore how action, process and form can reflect self-other relations, through the work of four Plymouth based artists. These artists are exhibited as part of a wider curatorial framework that questions the locality of the emerging artist. Arnold-Young focuses on the perception of high and low culture, as well as the emotional and physical self when creating paintings through performance, questioning how painting is viewed and produced. Through social engagement and participatory exchange, Hillon explores the construction of painting and the idea of self and others within an artwork. A subversive use of traditional mediums is also seen in the work of Watson who produces structural forms or imagery as a catalyst for self reflection and consideration of human behavior, placing a value on negative space as a tool within the work. This ties into the work of Leman, who looks at perception of self and hidden emotion through a process of repetitive application or removal. I intend to exhibit works by Leman, Hillon and Watson and commission a performance work for the exhibition opening by Arnold-Young, the results of which would then be exhibited within the gallery. Bringing this performance element into the exhibition and the opening will draw a larger audience, which is directly beneficial for emerging artists as it provides networking opportunities. This exhibit sits within a broader curatorial intention to engage with and create discussion on the position of the emerging artist. This is a long term plan that I have already begun to develop as part of Dis. Collective, a Plymouth based art collective, with a future design to create exhibition space with this curatorial framework. I view the PAC Home Curatorial Grant as the catalyst for my long term goals. By exhibiting artists and accessing the support sessions offered with the curatorial grant, I feel I would gain the most from this opportunity because I can take what I have learnt to help further develop Plymouths art scene. View further details on Dis. Collective here: http:// siobhanfedden.wordpress.com/category/dis-collective/

Venue: PAC

Dates/Duration: 18th March 2014 – 31st March 2014

Preferred Support Sessions: Event management/planning, Curating and exhibition interpretation, Legacy and future strategy

Technical Requirements: Exhibition instillation and de-instillation equipment and materials (drill, paint, screws, protective cloths, cleaning materials, spirit level, step ladder)

Initial Marketing Strategy:

The focus of the marketing strategy will be primarily online, utilizing social media to access the student demographic who predominantly contact each other and source event information online, building a wider student involvement in Plymouths pre-existing art scene. The student demographic is the focus as PCA and art courses at Plymouth University, provide a large audience with a direct interest in art. Due to the involvement of artists who attend these institutions, I have direct email access to the large student population. A poster will be produced to distribute within Plymouth and used online as promotional tool. Use of social media and the internet lowers advertisement production costs, which is vital considering the limited budget and promotes the artists to a national and international audience. The performance work will be filmed and published online as promotion. By building an online presence for the exhibition I can promote the artists work and Plymouth Art Centre.

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